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Translations

Q1: How should translations work?

Assumptions:This study is based on the following assumptions:-

  • Old Testament and New Testament were originally written in Hebrew
  • God's cultural thinking is Hebraic thought.

    Hypothesis: Why do translators translate Hebrew inconsistently?

    Introduction: Words in the Bible are also symbols of seeds. Seeds have dormant power inside of them ready to germinate into life once you take the seed and plant it in the garden soil of your mind. The Holy Spirit breathes warmth, air and water over it and it germinates with the power of Jesus within. Each Hebrew word is a seed and with a basic meaning of its own, that does not change radically because of the context.

    Many of the Hebrew words are with broad meanings, thus the DNA in them can adapt differently and lightly to the other words found in sentences of context. This adaptation changes the meaning of the Word slightly, but this is not a new species with different multiple meanings. The word studies listed here on this website go to painful lengths to show you every occurrence of a Hebrew word found in scripture, in both OT and NT. This is done to show you a Hebrew word like any word in a mother tongue has a consistent meaning every time the word is used. It is recently discovered the entire NT was written also in Hebrew, thus making the Hebrew language the mother of all languages and of salvation. While it is not necessary to learn Hebrew to obtain the messages of Scripture that God has for you, it is helpful to read and understand Hebrew culture and word meanings as the Hebrew people would have seen them.

    The author of this website struggled to find a Bible that translated Hebrew words consistently. Jeff Benner's work, in Ancient Hebrew Research Center is invaluable to me. He is one of the first apart from myself to believe Hebrew words have a single basic meaning that does not change across its context. While some multiple meanings in words do exist, its rare in languages and Hebrew is no exception. We have done much to spoil the messages of God in our Bibles with spurious translations, so this website follows Jeff Benner's influence with Ancient Hebrew meanings but the author's application of Hebrew words is from my own inspiration with GOD.

    With child like faith these words of Hebrew come to you fresh and with the same similar meanings as the King James Bible. We present not a brand new faith, but a renewed faith based on Ancient Hebrew that is consistently applied to all verses that use each Hebrew word. God bless your patient study of the Hebrew words.

    This study looks at the problems of translations and why the Author was influenced by Jeff Benner.

    Method: See selections of Jeff Benner's website.

    Conclusion: For serious readers of Scripture, one is better to have the English word substituted for the Hebrew, thus preserving the meaning of the original as much as possible without causing bias from making the text readable for another language. This is a difficult task, but often compromise is made at the expense of the Hebrew. For the reader to trust the translator, there should be a consistent translation, so transparency is maintained.

    Discussion:


    (1): Mechanical Translation

    "QUOTE" The major advantage to the Mechanical Translation for the student of the Bible is that it consistently translates each Hebrew word in the exact same way each time it occurs in the text. This allows the reader to see the Hebrew text, without even knowing Hebrew, in its pure form void from any personal interpretation being interjected into the text. Source "End Quote

    If one could read the Bible in English knowing that each English word was the exact same Hebrew word, one would eliminate bias from reading the text, unless the English word was the wrong meaning for the Hebrew. In any language words do not have multiple meanings (though some words might in any language) the word remains the same word throughout its context, though sometimes different meanings are understood by its arrangement in the sentence. The problem with translators is they try to make the meaning for you rather than just give you the Hebrew in English and allow the reader to understand the meaning.

    Jeff Benner translates consistently the same English word for the same Hebrew words every time.

    For example "mashal" Strong's 4910. Jeff Benner's "regulate"

    Genesis 1:18 and to "regulate" in the day and in the night and to make a separation between the light and the darkness and “Elohiym [Powers]” saw that it was functional,

    Genesis 3:16 To the woman he said, I will make a great increase of your hardship and your pregnancy, in distressing pain you will bring forth sons and to your man is your following and he will regulate in you,

    Genesis 4:7 If you cause it to be done well, will it not be lifted up and if you do not cause it to be done well, an opening of error is stretching out and to you is his following and you will regulate in him,

    While the author thinks a better English word is "rule" at least we both agree the same consistency should be applied for all occurrences of the Hebrew.


    (2) :Translating Hebrew thought consistently

    Translators often ignore Hebrew thought and give the reader the same English word spoiling the Bible context completely. Source

    Ge 6:5 And GOD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart "leb" was only evil continually.

    And GOD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only dysfunction continually.

    Ps 40:8 I delight to do thy will, O my God: yea, thy law is within my heart "me'ah".

    I delight to do thy will, O my God: yea, thy law is within my gut.

    Ex 23:9 Also thou shalt not oppress a stranger: for ye know the heart "nephesh" of a stranger, seeing ye were strangers in the land of Egypt.

    Also thou shalt not oppress a stranger: for ye know the "soul" or "living energy" of a stranger, seeing ye were strangers in the land of Egypt.

    Jer 9:8 Their tongue is as an arrow shot out; it speaketh deceit: one speaketh peaceably to his neighbour with his mouth, but in heart "qereb" he layeth his wait.

    Their tongue is as an arrow shot out; it speaketh deceit: one speaketh peaceably to his neighbour with his mouth, but in their insides he layeth his wait.

    Ps 7:9 Oh let the wickedness of the wicked come to an end; but establish the just: for the righteous God trieth the hearts "libbah" and reins.

    Oh let the wickedness of the wicked come to an end; but establish the just: for the righteous God trieth the kidneys and reins.

    All of these words are different Hebrew words, yet the translators render them all into the same English word: "heart". This takes away the Hebrew meaning and replaces it with Roman-Greek thinking.

    In other contexts the translators may use the same Hebrew word but render it into different English words...spoiling the consistency of the Hebrew.

    Ge 31:20 And Jacob stole away unawares "leb" to Laban the Syrian, in that he told him not that he fled.

    And Jacob stole the heart of Laban the Syrian, in that he told him not that he fled.

    Ex 9:21 And he that regarded "leb" not the word of the LORD left his servants and his cattle in the field.

    And he cared not for the heart of the word of the LORD left his servants and his cattle in the field.

    Nu 16:28 And Moses said, Hereby ye shall know that the LORD hath sent me to do all these works; for I have not done them of mine own mind "leb".

    And Moses said, Hereby ye shall know that the LORD hath sent me to do all these works; for I have not done them of mine own heart.

    Job 36:5 ¶ Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any: he is mighty in strength and wisdom "leb".

    Behold, God is mighty, and despiseth not any: he is mighty in strength and heart.

    So what does the Hebrew word "leb"(heart) mean? The word means "heart" but is more similar to our "mind".


    The inconsistency of KJV is one of the main reasons the author found it difficult to read the real meaning of Hebrew words. Often many Hebrew words have scores of English meanings to choose from, making understanding the Hebrew near impossible. The author found Jeff Benner's work by accident trying to overcome the scholar's acceptance of polysemy, the strange belief that in any language there are numerous examples of words with multiple meanings. Instead the author believes in any language words have a single basic meaning regardless of the context it is in; although there are slight changes to meaning when words are placed in the context of a sentence.

    For example; "ishshah" in Hebrew means woman, but in some contexts extends the meaning as "wife" the "woman belonging to a certain man".

    Ge 2:23 And Adam said, This is now bone of my bones, and flesh of my flesh: she shall be called Woman "ishshah", because she was taken out of Man "iyish".

  • 24 Therefore shall a man "iyish" leave his father and his mother, and shall cleave unto his wife "ishshah": and they shall be one flesh.
  • 25 And they were both naked, the man "adam" and his wife "ishshah" , and were not ashamed. (KJV)

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